The Future of Fashion Is Code, Not Couture

francis bitonti cloud dress
Burlesque icon Dita von Teese wearing a 3D-printed  designed by Francis Bitonti in collaboration with Shapeways and costume designer Michael Schmidt

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It’s hard to believe that this dress was built using a 3D printer. Designer Francis Bitonti has shifted how we look at the idea of creation. He is stepping outside of the box, throwing away the needle and thread (probably his Singer* as well). By teaming up with MakerBot, a New York-based company founded in January 2009, Bitonti has created a masterpiece of design entitled Cloud which was unveiled on April 4:

The capsule collection offers four decorative housewares, or rather, the code for these items. By modifying one aspect of the code, consumers can decide how much noise or relief appears on the surface of a vase or bowl, resulting in a customized purchase.

Francis Bitonti Studio will directly sell data files of 3D printables, beginning with home goods April 2014 and will transition into accessories Fall 2014.   Each item is customizable, and consumers have the option to use a sliding scale to adjust the look of the piece.

“Our aim is to embed the properties of digital media into physical realities,“ explained founder Francis Bitonti.  “We’ve created products that are hackable, shareable, and downloadable, which enables us to bring the consumer customizable, locally produced products on demand and without excess waste, resulting in a low-carbon foot print.”  After 3D printing, the product can be picked up directly from the hub producer or it can be locally shipped.  All products are designed to be printed on a MakerBot® Replicator® Desktop 3D Printer.

Dita von Teese and Francis Bitonti
THE MAKING OF THE SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL ENCRUSTED GOWN:

 

* Singer – Singer Corporation is an American manufacturer of sewing machines, first established as I. M. Singer & Co. in 1851 by Isaac Merritt Singer with New York lawyer Edward Clark.